MAKING SPACES BETTER

Public Architecture channels pro bono design to underserved communities

“WHY SPEND THE TIME AND RESOURCES WE SPEND ON ENTERING DESIGN COMPETITIONS,” asked architect John Peterson, “when we could put that same time and effort into projects that net a much greater good, both socially and environmentally?”

With this question, John founded Public Architecture, the leading U.S. advocate for donated architecture and design services. Founded in 2002, Public Architecture is a charity that matches architecture and design firms willing to donate their time with non-profit organizations in need of design assistance.

Through a generous year-end donation to Public Architecture, Teknion enables Public Architecture to leverage pro bono design services towards community efforts. Coupled with a series of showroom presentations nationwide, Teknion supports Public Architecture’s recruitment of A & D firms, which now total over 700 since The 1 % program of Public Architecture was launched in 2005.

“If every architecture professional in the U.S. were to give one percent of their time , it would add up to 5 million hours...”

- Public Architecture

“We wanted to find an opportunity to affect positive change within our industry,” explains Maxine Mann, President of Teknion’s U.S. operations, “so we set out to find an organization, and Public Architecture was the winner, as it uses design to build better spaces, just like us.”

Mary Ellen Magee, Teknion Director, Marketing and Communications, comments that, “We love the way The 1 % program engages A & D firms to improve their communities. Teknion worked with Public Architecture to launch a program, called Public Offering, challenging other major manufacturers to match our contribution.”

Through The 1 % program, A & D firms are taking on projects for community centers, health clinics, libraries, schools and social service agencies. Accordingly, through its support of Public Architecture, Teknion becomes a key supporter in the movement to provide services to the social sector.

perspective gained : Public Architecture proves, in their words, “Environmental efforts at odds with basic human needs such as health, justice, and pleasure, will be short-lived at best.”