THE QUEST FOR HARMONY WITH THE ENVIRONMENT

Designers embrace
ancient principles

DEVELOPER JEFFREY ABRAMSON OF THE TOWER COMPANIES, MARYLAND, BELIEVES THAT LIFE CAN BE IMPROVED THROUGH ARCHITECTURE. For proof, his company’s headquarters have been called “the greenest office building in Maryland.” The building received double Platinum LEED certifications–in both New Construction and Commercial Interiors.

The Tower Companies’ headquarters are an interpretation of Vedic [Indian] architecture. This ancient formula incorporates three key principles: orientation, proportion and placement. A Vedic office building is engineered to enhance productivity, success and well being of its inhabitants. 2000 Tower Oaks is the largest commercial application of Vedic architecture in the world.

Abramson refers to a statistic that in the U.S., “40 percent of the energy use in America that causes pollution is created by office buildings…. If we are part of the problem, we can be part of the solution.”

“40 percent of the energy use in America that causes pollution is created by office buildings... If we are part of the problem, we can be part of the solution.”

- Jeffrey Abramson, Principal, Tower Companies

Tower discovered a further synergy between it and Teknion when it learnt that Teknion offered a CEU (continuing education unit) on Vedic architecture. Tower’s architect enrolled in the course opening up another avenue for shared learning and collaboration.

Chuck Wallach, Tower’s Director of Leasing and Tenant Construction, has these words for Teknion’s work: “Our process was incredibly collaborative from start to finish; their depth of understanding was unprecedented. They are a model company.”

Tracy Backus, Teknion National Manager of Sustainable Programs, observes that LEED is now part of the evolution of architecture alongside the Vedic principles. This joins these disciplines across time, and benefits modern buildings–and their workers–with the harmony of ancient principles.

perspective gained : LEED has become part of the evolution and dialogue of people and spaces. Looking back from the future, people will see LEED as part of this evolution, like we look at Vedic architecture. We don’t necessarily know what is ahead of us. But we know that LEED is ensconced as a transformative element.