Towards new
workplace paradigms


​​Introduction

Furniture is a canvas for talking about people. Teknion & PearsonLloyd collaborated on design concepts to get us talking about how we work and where we're headed.

Teknion and PearsonLloyd have collaborated to investigate design concepts that embody humanistic principles and the key narratives of Ethonomics. These pieces address shared collaborative space and celebrate the craft of ​Teknion’s manufacturing process.

Luke Pearson and Tom Lloyd setup design studio PearsonLloyd in 1997. Since then, the London-based practice has worked across the workplace, aviation, urban design and healthcare sectors with a goal to identify and respond to the shifting patterns of behaviour in contemporary life.

PearsonLloyd The studio takes a collaborative approach to its work, embracing the restrictions imposed by production, the market and all the other factors that define a brief. Its work is grounded in research, and at the core is an attempt to understand the relationship between a product, its place and the way people use it.

In 2008, Tom and Luke were awarded the distinction of Royal Designers for Industry by The Royal Society of Arts, and in August 2012 were named one of the top 50 designers ‘Shaping the Future’ by Fast-Co Magazine in New York.


Paradigms

“We like to operate in the public realm… To us, it is interesting to know that our work is going to be out there, surrounded by people using it.”


Shared Experience

“We’ve got a territory we call shared space… Our work often boils down to the question of how people who don’t know each other interact with each other in a shared space.”


Craft of Industry

“The craft of industry doesn’t just refer to the technical element; it’s the ability to work with the restrictions of the factory, the market, the client, the engineer, the materials and the price.”


Behaviour

“We’re not just interested in the form and technical performance of an object, we’re interested in what happens around the object; how it can potentially shift behaviour and the way we do things.”


Beauty and Efficiency

“We can spend months tweaking a form, making sure it doesn’t use more plastic than it needs to — changing the thickness by fractions of a millimeter — and making sure it’s still robust.”


“We’re not just interested in the form and technical performance of an object, we’re interested in what happens around the object; how it can potentially shift behaviour and the way we
do things.”